A timely diagnosis

A timely diagnosis

Tick-borne disease testing from Quest Diagnostics

The clinical presentation
does not always tell the whole story

While many tick-borne diseases have overlapping symptoms that include fever, rash, body aches, fatigues, headaches, and chills, some patients are asymptomatic and/or experience a delay in the appearance of symptoms.

To complicate the picture, in many cases, co-infection with multiple tick-borne diseases is common. A recent study of more than 3,000 patients suffering from post-treatment Lyme disease found that over 50% had co-infections, with 30% reporting 2 or more co-infections.1

With the likelihood of overlapping symptoms and co-infections, identifying a specific tick-borne illness can be challenging, although it’s essential to initiating the right treatment. Selecting and using the right laboratory test can help uncover actionable insights, sooner.

Tick-borne disease a growing problem across the country

Tick-borne diseases primarily spread in the spring, summer, and fall. They are especially prevalent in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, and their incidence is on the rise.

47,743

total reported cases of tick-borne diseases2

33,666

cases of Lyme disease2

50 states

reporting cases of tick-borne diseases2

320%
increase

in number of northeastern US counties having a high incidence of Lyme disease3

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a 2-step testing process for Lyme disease.

Step 1: ELISA testing detects antibodies against the B. burgdorferi bacterium. This test may give a false-negative result early in the infection (within 2 weeks), or an equivocal or false-positive result at any time.

Step 2: The ELISA result should be verified by a Western blot (immunoblot) test. A negative result is considered confirmation of no infection, while a positive result confirms the infection.

Accurate, timely differential diagnosis

When it comes to diagnosing a tick-borne disease, the timing and selection of the appropriate test is critical. Depending upon the patient’s initial exposure, onset, and presence of symptoms, Quest Diagnostics offers more than 30 tick-borne disease tests and panels to help make an informed diagnosis and initiate the right treatment, which could lead to better outcomes for your patients.

Tick-borne Disease, Acute Molecular Panel

When: 1-2 weeks after disease onset

The science:

  • Nucleic acid amplification (e.g., molecular testing, RT-PCR)
Panel information +
Test code 94322
CPT codes* 87798 (x4), 87801
Preferred Specimen 3 mL whole  blood collected  in an EDTA (lavender-top) tube
Turnaround Time 2-3 days
  •  The CPT codes provided are based on American Medical Association guidelines and are for informational purposes only. CPT coding is the sole responsibility of the billing party. Please direct any questions regarding coding to the payer being billed.

Tick-borne Disease, Antibody Panel

When: Days / months / years after disease onset

The science: Detection of antibodies—the body’s immunological response to pathogen

  • Appearance of IgM and IgG antibodies 4-7 days or later, after disease onset
  • IgM antibodies may remain in the system for 2-3 months
  • IgG antibodies may remain in the body for a lifetime
Panel information +
Test code 36942
CPT codes* 86666 (x2), 86753 (x3), 86618, 86666 (x2)
Preferred Specimen 2 mL serum
Turnaround Time 1-3 days
  • The CPT codes provided are based on American Medical Association guidelines and are for informational purposes only. CPT coding is the sole responsibility of the billing party. Please direct any questions regarding coding to the payer being billed.
"

It’s easy to get started with Quest

Visit the test directory
Create an account

Insights you can count on

Quest offers you and your patients the tests, tools, and expertise you need to make more informed healthcare decisions:

Innovative testing options, ranging from routine to highly specialized tests

Seamless EHR/IT integration with over 650 EHR systems

Dedicated, national subject-matter experts are available for consultation and results interpretation

Tools and services to optimize patient care

QuestQuanum™ can help you deliver patient care more efficiently, streamline your practice workflow, and save valuable staff time

We make testing simple for your patients

Quest Diagnostics is here for your patients with access to testing, tools, and services that encourage engagement and promote compliance:

Broad, in-network access with most major health plans

MyQuest™ Patient Portal and mobile app

Low out-of-pocket costs

Payment Assistance Program for patients who are under-insured or uninsured

Nearby Patient Service Centers for convenient testing

Free ebook:
a comprehensive guide to tick-borne testing

Sign up today to receive a series of articles that can help improve your understanding of tick-borne diseases and what to look for to make a timely, accurate diagnosis.

Tick-borne disease a growing problem across the country

Tick-borne diseases primarily spread in the spring, summer, and fall. They are especially prevalent in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, and their incidence is on the rise.

47,743

total reported cases of tick-borne diseases2

33,666

cases of Lyme disease2

50 states

reporting cases of tick-borne diseases2

320%
increase

in number of northeastern US counties having a high incidence of Lyme disease3

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a 2-step testing process for Lyme disease.

Step 1: ELISA testing detects antibodies against the B. burgdorferi bacterium. This test may give a false-negative result early in the infection (within 2 weeks), or an equivocal or false-positive result at any time.

Step 2: The ELISA result should be verified by a Western blot (immunoblot) test. A negative result is considered confirmation of no infection, while a positive result confirms the infection.

It’s easy to get started with Quest

Visit the test directory
Create an account

Insights you can count on

Quest offers you and your patients the tests, tools, and expertise you need to make more informed healthcare decisions:

Innovative testing options, ranging from routine to highly specialized tests

Seamless EHR/IT integration with over 650 EHR systems

Dedicated, national subject-matter experts are available for consultation and results interpretation

Tools and services to optimize patient care

QuestQuanum™ can help you deliver patient care more efficiently, streamline your practice workflow, and save valuable staff time

We make testing simple for your patients

Quest Diagnostics is here for your patients with access to testing, tools, and services that encourage engagement and promote compliance:

Broad, in-network access with most major health plans

Low out-of-pocket costs

Payment Assistance Program for patients who are under-insured or uninsured

MyQuest™ Patient Portal and mobile app

Nearby Patient Service Centers for convenient testing

Free ebook: a comprehensive guide to tick-borne testing

Sign up today to receive a series of articles that can help improve your understanding of tick-borne diseases and what to look for to make a timely, accurate diagnosis.

References

  1. Johnson L, Wilcox S, Mankoff J, Stricker RB. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey. PeerJ. 2014;2:e322. doi: 10.7717/peerj.322
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Tickborne disease surveillance data summary. Accessed April 10, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/data-summary/index.html
  3. Kugeler KJ, Farley GM, Forrester JD, Mead PS. Geographic distribution and expansion of human Lyme disease, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2015;21(8):1455-1457. doi:10.3201/eid2108.141878

Image content used for illustrative purposes only. Persons depicted in the content are models.

References

  1. Johnson L, Wilcox S, Mankoff J, Stricker RB. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey. PeerJ. 2014;2:e322. doi: 10.7717/peerj.322
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Tickborne disease
    surveillance data summary. Accessed April 10, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/data-summary/index.html
  3. Kugeler KJ, Farley GM, Forrester JD, Mead PS. Geographic distribution and expansion of human Lyme disease, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2015;21(8):1455-1457. doi:10.3201/eid2108.141878

 

Image content used for illustrative purposes only. Persons depicted in the content are models.

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